m
  USS Noxubee AOG56

A Tribute To Those That Served

Thank a Veteran

Home
Association
History
Shipmates
Memories
Memorial
Crews
Lost Contacts
Agent Orange
Reunion
Gallery
Guestbook
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45-59 ribbon bar
Noxubee Crest

Ships Newsletter 1951-1952-The Gas Line


Submitted by Dick Barber & Jim Claughton
Edited by Paul Gryniewicz

 

Excerpts from the 1st Edition 1 February 1951

A SHIP'S PAPER IS BORN
The Noxubee, commonly known as the most sea going vessel in the fleet, has developed its own newspaper. This is our first edition. Let's hope there will be another...

...The "GAS-LINE" will contain various transcriptions from the Navy Dept. Bulletins which may be of interest to the crew. It will run feature articles, print classified advertisements, or just about anything that will tend to increase the morale and enjoyment of all hands. Let's hear your side of the story. Until arrangements are made to handle contributions thru a "Contribution Box" hand them in to the Ship's Office. We'll be waiting. Ed.

TWO MEN FROM NOXUBEE MISS SAILING

22 Jan. 1951: One of LTJG Uczynski's ablebodied seamen, a chap known as Albecker, probably thought they didn't include him when they wrote "Articles for the Government of the Navy." Auriemma, his partner in crime, must have had the same idea, because both men are on a vacation, which it is believed, makes two LTJGs very, very undermanned. But perk-up, the Captain said we're going to have a big homecoming party for them, probably serving bread and water.

CASABLANCA

Casablanca -- Land of the Cash Bar. Casablanca, the economic capital, largest town, and most important part of Morocco, spreads in a well-planned semi-circle on all sides of the ancient walled native town. Bars and nightclubs are plentiful but quite expensive. There are a number of restaurants at which a good meal, exclusive of wines, can be had for about $2.00 a person. Among those recommended are Nolly, Petite Poucet, Oasis, Monaco, Comedie, and Anfa. The basic unit of currency is the French Moroccan franc which is on a par with the Metropolitan franc. The current legal rate of exchange is 350 francs to the U.S. dollar. It is recommended that ships procure French Moroccan francs from the NAA Disbursing Officer at Port Lyautey.

 

Excerpts from the 16 February 1951 edition

BLUE TROUSERS.

SecNav letter 50-972, ND Bulletin of 12-15-50 is quoted herewith for information of All Hands:

"1. Issue of the enlisted men's blue trousers with pockets and zipper-fly front will begin immediately in sizes in which stocks of the button-front style have been exhausted. When stocks of each additional size of the button-front styles are depleted, issue and sale of the zipper-front styles will be started.

2. Either the buttoned-front or zipper-front style is regulation and will be worn for dress or undress concurrently in all naval units until a date to be announced later.

3. Appropriate changes to U.S. Navy Uniform Regulations, 1947, will be issued at a later date."

REDUCED LEAVE FARES ON RAILROADS

AlNav 7-50 is quoted herewith for information of All Hands: "Railroads have granted reduced round trip leave fares for all military, naval, and marine personnel, including cadets and midshipmen, on written authority for leave, including liberty cards, but not on identification cards, and traveling in uniform at their own expense. This is good in coaches only. The general basis is 2 cents per mile, although in some territories it will be 2.025 cents and in other territories it will be slightly less than 2 cents. Effective tickets sale dates 26 Jan. 1951 to 31 March 1951, inclusive, and will be good for 30 days from date of sale. The same route in both directions to apply. Stop-overs and usual baggage privileges are allowed. Federal transportation tax is not applicable to these fares."

 

Excerpts from the 1 June 1951 edition

LOCAL HIGHLITES BY ED. USS NOXUBEE:

The Navy is proud of some of the old sea-dogs we still have. After completing almost 30 years straight se duty (and he looks it), "Stew" Dupont volunteered for OOD watches. Reason!, says the old sea-dog, when I retire from naval service, I'm following the sea for a long career.

USS NOXUBEE: During a recent inspection, one of the more prominent members of the inspection party busted a fingernail trying to open the CPO icebox. Result: Defrosting every other day.

USS NOXUBEE: Cuba has rebelled against old "Salt Water" Birmingham. Upon return from base liberty, he insisted that a gang of rebels threw him in Gitmo Bay (with his coconuts).

USS NOXUBEE: The MAA force of the Noxubee has been shuffled considerably with the transfer of Higman. Campese says he can't walk his catwalk and wear the badge of authority at the same time. Borden was recruited as his aid. During an inspection, the Boss thought Brooks ought to try his hand at it. Now Brooks is the local sheriff and rumors say he has a sharp eye open for a relief.

 

Excerpts from the 1 September 1951 edition

ON THE LOCAL FRONT

The Noxubee hastily threw a basketball team together to encounter the Medics of Whellus Air Base. A thunderous applause rendered through the air to pay homage to the sailors as Coach Tinker's men took the floor in downtown Tripoli. Although nip and tuck throughout the first quarter, the NOXUBEEMEN trailed in the second to be on the short end of a 17-7 count at the half, but nothing that Hollywood could offer could do justice to their startling performance under the stars in the second half. As the lights were turned on to begin the half, the NOXUBEEMEN took control of both boards to dwindle the Medics lead to 3 points going into the last and final quarter, but the strain of no practice began once again to show on the Sailors, but they were not to go down without a fight as they pulled to within one point of the Medics as the last and final whistle blew. The NOXUBEEMEN show promise of having a rough and ready ball club, as our future visit to Naples would round out the rough edges and put the boys in shape. Anyone interested in joining the squad should see Chief Tinker for details.

 

Excerpts from an undated edition

WARDROOM NOTE

LT J.C. Claughton got orders setting his discharge for an indefinite time in October or November. When asked for a statement by your reporter, Mr. Claughton just chewed on his pipe and smiled.

Foxy's Beach Patrol by Orville "Foxy" Noxy BMON1.

This column is designed to give you the straight poop on various shore activities ranging from the SILVER DOLLAR to SYMPHONY HALL. All members of the crew are encouraged to contribute any experience or scuttlebutt concerning whether you've been clipped or sober.

On Foxy's First Saturday night in Boston, he ripped down to the Armed Forces club to see what was cooking -- not much as far as women were concerned, but with the help of the clerk at the desk he found where the various dances were around town and the amount of stag gals at each.

After a short stop at the TOURRAYNE BAR where perfume and spirits are often blended in the proper proportion, he swayed over to the BRADFORD HOTEL which runs a dance on the roof every Friday and Saturday night. The charge is $1.25 a person -- and Foxy was overjoyed to find that the place was loaded -- and with a convenient place to indulge right next door. Many dances later, Foxy and his newly acquired date left the BRADFORD and found themselves in the unusual atmosphere of the BAVARIAN RATHSKELLER; though the prices are a little high on weekends, he sang songs, danced polkas, and toasted the other guests with his stein of beer. Foxy also made the acquaintance of Christina, the blond, singing and dancing waitress.

Still seeing single, Foxy and company left the Tremont Street area and traveled to other ports. He couldn't make up his mind whether to see Candy, a boy-girl (?) be-bop artist at the HI-HAT, or Wild Bill Davidson at CLUB SAVOY. He finally settled for the late show at the CASINO in Scully Square, hoping to see Pat Halliday, a redheaded strip queen built like a cement washroom. Even though Pat wasn't there, Foxy was able to squint through his now bloodshot eyes and use his vivid imagination -- take it off, take it off.

"What!" gurgled Foxy indignantly as the clock tolled one, "You mean I can't have anymore #%*&_%:7 and 7! As the sidewalks folded up, so did Foxy.

"They tell me I had a hell of a time last night," groaned Foxy at quarters.

More adventures of Foxy Noxy, BMON1, in the next issue, and until then Foxy says, "All the world is like an icebox, so play it cool."